A little print viewing tutorial.

November 23, 2012  •  Leave a Comment

What you see on your computer may seem quite different than the printed image you receive in regards to color, brightness and contrast.

As a photographer, my objective is to provide my clients printed images that match, as closely as possible, to the actual digital image on my computer screen. There are many variables that can influence the colors, density and tonality of a printed photograph that the client sees.
Variables include the white balance and color space (sRGB, Adobe RGB) settings on the camera that took the actual photograph, to the brightness, contrast and color settings of one's computer's monitor, to the room color and brightness the computer monitor is located in, to the printer's make and model, to the paper and ink types the printer is printing with, to the room brightness and light temperatures the printed image is viewed in. Even the color choices of the matte and frame can affect the prints color bias.

It seems almost impossible to maintain consistent color integrity from start to finish and in reality it is.

As the photographer I can control all of these factors from the time I snap the shutter to the time I make the print but once the print is delivered to the buyer everything, at that point, is out of my direct control.

My photos are optimized to be enjoyed under "Daylight" viewing conditions, meaning, a room lit by natural daylight or daylight balanced display lights used to display the print will make the print look as intended. 
For instance, if one looks at a printed image when there are lots of windows and natural light in the room the print will look differently, than when one closes the windows and turns on the living room lamps which normally glow much warmer than daylight and will give the print a darker and redder appearance. 

There are many different things that can influence the way the photos look on my website, from the default settings of un-calibrated LCD screens (monitors), smartphone LCD screens, CRT screens, all of which have different color, contrast and brightness settings. Most default settings on computer screens are "extra" bright and have a "cooler" (bluer) color settings applied.

I hope this helps to understand how many different factors influence the way a print can look and they will look great in your home or office.

Thanks for reading!

Howard

 


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